Archive for racism

Don’t tell me that racism doesnt still exist…

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when my mom is having problems with a redneck doctor named Evan Jones.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when the only reason this redneck doctor doesn’t want to give her a nurse is because he is racist, even though you should know that being middle eastern or even Muslim, it’s not your race.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when he makes my mom do his work and my mom’s not even complaining.

Don’t tell me he’s sexist either because he treats his wife with the utmost respect and she’s a housewife too.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when he asked my mom why is our president African American, and he’s educated too.

It’s really sad when an educated doctor who makes around $90,000 per year still thinks that way. It angers me and it makes me think there’s no hope for people. It angers me because why would people teach that in the first place. Why is it always an us vs. them mentality? Why must we always divide ourselves and then categorize ourselves into groups and the based on that we set stereotypes to these people and some of them are negative.

The best example is that Muslims are terrorist. The media is an excellent source in perpetuating these stereotypes.

I see the “hate” they have in their eyes, the indifference they have towards us. Yes, I am a foreigner. Yes, I do wear the scarf. But it doesn’t mean I am stupid or don’t know English or even a terrorist.

Why are the stereotypes one dimensional? I mean if you dissect any human being, you won’t find only the heart or the brain or the lungs or the liver. You will find that the human being is very complex, much more complex than even one organ system. So why are the stereotypes one dimensional?

This is how destructive racism is.

My mom quit because they weren’t treating her fairly.

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White Trophy

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

I am sorry, but I feel like I have to address this.

This is to all the African American girls who hate it when an African American guy dates or marries white or a Caucasian woman.

I am sorry that you might feel betrayed by your own race.
I am sorry if you think he has a “white trophy” on his arm.

But you have to know that the African American guy who dates a white girl, there’s nothing wrong with him. The very fact that he is dating a white woman proves that he is human, not that he betrayed your race.

If you actually read your history, you would know that during slavery, they had the one drop rule. It was: a law that if a slave owner raped or had sex with an African American woman, the children she had were still slaves, which means they were still African American, even though they were half white.

I would not be surprised if they still use it today.

So in reality, you should be happy when he marries white because he is bringing more people into your population. He didn’t betray your race. He’s actually adding more people to it.

And don’t you dare think he has a “white trophy” on his arm.

Besides you don’t know her and you have no right to judge her. Even if you did know her, you still have no right to judge her either.

She could be a mean person, but she could also be a really nice, sweet person, but since you didn’t take the time to get to know that, you wouldn’t know that. And I will be feel bad for you.

It’s sad, and I have said this many many many times before, when you judge a person based on the color of their skin or based on if they are really pretty or not, you miss a lot by doing that. I mean a lot.

So again I say please don’t judge me or my friends or anyone else based on what they look like because you’d be very surprised on what you can find.

Does Race Matter?

Posted in race, race is a social concept, racism with tags , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

So my philosophy of race professor posts up a question on their blog.

Does race matter?

He really liked my response. 🙂

Race – (biology) a taxonomic group that is a division of a species; usually arises as a consequence of geographical isolation within a species.

First of all, I don’t believe race is biological. It is based on biological features that are perceived to be different. It is perceived to be different.

If you take off the skin of all the people in the world, you will find out that one person is no different from another person. If you do make it biological, it’s like saying that the African American is a totally different species from the Caucasian, which is not the case.

I had a person comment on my blog last year about why I support interracial dating, saying that the African American and the Caucasian is like a penguin and a polar bear. It’s not true and I did correct him. But it does make me angry.

Taxonomy – a classification of organisms into groups based on similarities of structure or origin.

Second, implying that is a taxonomy, which might be implying that the writer holds Hardimon’s view of race, says that there is a difference between human being, and I totally agree based on the fact that we are all individually different and no one is as unique as I am. But to say that all people who have that shade of skin color think the same or do the same thing is wrong because everybody is different so everybody doesn’t think the same way.

Geographical Isolation is a huge consequence, in my opinion, because it leads to unequal housing, unequal schools, unequal job opportunities, higher health risks, higher abortion rates.

I hold the Haslanger’s view of race, so with that said, I believe that race was invented to divide up human beings based on perceived biological differences and for one “race” to rule another “race”, based on if they are the majority group or minority group, here in the United States.

Race does matter. In politics and sociology, race does matter. Race is all about politics and sociology. I believe that race is used to separate people who are perceived to be different. When stereotypes are added to the equation and the stereotypes are considered bad, it becomes an “us versus them” mentality. We are not them. We don’t have yellow, blue, green, white, or black skin. We are not robbers or thieves or criminals. We are not sexual people. We don’t have babies out of wedlock. We are not terrorists. We don’t oppress our people. We are not them. We separate ourselves from them.

It leads to the minority population in the inner city and the majority population in the suburbs. It leads to the inner city schools and housing are in bad shape, and the suburb schools and housing are in good shape. It leads to the opportunities for the inner city students to go to higher education are worse than the students in the suburbs.

It also leads to Caucasian CEOs and African American workers. It leads to Caucasian slave owners and African American slaves. It leads to Caucasian sharecropper owners and African American and poor Caucasian sharecropper.

In our history, for example, during Jim Crow when it ruled the South, separation didn’t really matter as much as subordination. Subordination is defined as subject to submissive to authority or control of another.

You can still see it today.

I believe that race shouldn’t matter.

It shouldn’t matter if you are blue, green, purple, white, black, brown. It shouldn’t matter if you have nappy hair. It shouldn’t matter if you have a big nose or a small nose.

Just because you have a different texture hair or different eyes shouldn’t mean that you are better or worse than anyone else.

Maybe you are better off because our society gives privilege to the majority group. In the United States, it’s called “white privilege.” Those people who are racialized as “white” have a privilege as Peggy McIntosh in a small article called White Privilege: Unpacking the Knapsack said, “an invisible weightless knapsack of special provisions, maps, passports, codebooks, visas, clothes, tools , and blank checks.”

I sometimes ask myself “Why should I be privileged because I have lighter skin than some people? Why should I have special provisions, maps, passport, codebooks, visas, clothes tools and blank check? What about the other people who don’t have this privilege? Aren’t they human too? Don’t they breathe, eat, study, and play as I do? Why don’t they live in the same houses and go to the same schools?”

Our society gives a lot of emphasis on how you look, from the clothes you wear to how skinny you are, to how tall you are, to many, many things. I believe it’s such a superficial way of looking at things. There’s so much more to a person than they way they look and the way they dress.

This is just my opinion and nobody else has to agree with it.  🙂

Tolerance is good for everyone: an insightful look at racism

Posted in race, racism, racism today with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

“Tolerance is good for everyone: an insightful look at racism
by Josh Chicarelli

WARNING: The following blog contains racial slurs but they’re not used in a racist manner. So don’t take them out of context. They’re used to educate and give some insight into my background for those that don’t know.

You know, it never occurred to me until last night when I was watching comedienne Lisa Lampanelli on Comedy Central. I’ve never touched upon this topic before and some of the stuff I say about myself in here will be the first time that most of yous ever heard it. If you’re familiar with the comedy of Lisa Lampanelli or Carlos Mencia, you’d know that they do a lot of race related material. For instance, Lisa takes every stereotype about every race, sex, and creed and pokes fun at it. Carlos takes these same stereotypes and does the same thing but he puts it in perspective usually. I remember him saying once on his No Strings Attached special that “If you got a joke about a particular group of people, then you have no right to tell that joke unless you can tell that joke to the people that it pokes fun of.” He said this when he was telling a story about how the handicapped called him out on not doing handicap jokes in front of them because he didn’t wanna offend them but he learned first hand that it’s ok to do those jokes for the audiences that it pokes fun of because they have a sense of humor too.

Now with that said, no there will be no race related jokes from me here. I don’t really know if I could ever have the courage that Lisa or Carlos has. Something you all probably don’t know is that I, myself, have been a victim of racism. I can laugh at race related jokes and stuff like many other people when they’re not meant to be mean. Just laughing at the stereotypes that stupid people have pigeonholed on people. But when you attempt a joke that’s cold-hearted and absolutely racist, then there’s where I draw the line.

Imagine being 4-5 years old in kindergarten. Your only friend is a little black girl named Latoya and your so-called father starts calling you a nigger lover and saying shit about, “Do you want people to see you with a nigger? Do you want to be called a nigger lover by the church and everyone else?” Imagine having to go through that at 4 and 5 years old. …..It doesn’t end there. I’ve been dealing with racism my entire life and being a mix of Native American and Italian doesn’t help shit much. My skin is a little bit darker than everyone else’s. When we had those culture days in elementary school, imagine having a teacher, of all people, think you’re making a racist statement when you wear a Native American headdress to class to show off your culture and she doesn’t realize that you are Native American. As for me, I took offense to her doing that because I started feeling discriminated against.

…It still doesn’t end there. Fast forward to a few years ago. I was at my uncle’s house and he made pasta but I had food here that I wanted to eat and I hate pasta. My cousin Andrew asked me why I hated it and before I could get anything out my so-called uncle said this and I quote, “It’s that fuckin’ Indian in him!” I don’t know about you guys that’s reading this, but when he said that to me, I seriously wanted to punch him in the fuckin’ mouth for that. That shit pissed me the fuck off like you wouldn’t believe! Right after that, I just got up, left and walked home from Millersville by Pleasant Valley to Colfax. ….Not done yet people! Many of you know about my love of Asian cinema, food and culture. Well those that know me also know that my eyes don’t open as wide as everyone else’s either and that’s not because I’m Asian cause I’m not. It’s just I don’t have wide eyes. Well by my own father, yet again, I’ve been called chink-eyed, chinky, rice man, and pigeonholed with every Asian stereotype and slur you can imagine.

Because of all of that, I’ve grown to actually downright, not dislike or loathe my dad’s side of the family, but I’ve more or less grown to just hate them with a passion. That’s the Italian side of the family and thankfully I take more after my mom’s side which is the Native American side. They’re more tolerant of everyone and everything probably due to what the Europeans did when they first came here all those years ago and slaughtered our ancestors. Like a couple of years ago, I had a black girlfriend and that side knew about it but I had to keep it a secret from his side of the family to avert more racism.

And you know, there’s something I learned from the few black friends I have. They hate being called African-Americans and I asked them about that once and they told me that it was because they find that political correctness nonsense to be insulting to them. They just wanna be treated like everyone else. They want people to talk to them normally and not try to sound like they’re smarter than them or anyone else because they viewed the political correct terms as more racist than calling them black. I thought that was interesting, but you know, they were right. They are fucking right! If I was black, I’d probably be thinking the same thing.

There’s one thing though, I can’t apply that same way of thinking to being Native American because we actually do prefer to be called Native Americans rather than Indian. It mostly has to do with the fact that Indians are people from India, not people from this country originally. I can make fun of the Native American stereotypes because those don’t bother me that much and they are kinda funny. Like when someone pisses me off and they’re like, “Uh oh, don’t scalp me!” I seriously laugh at that because we don’t scalp people and when they’ve said it to me. Another stereotype I find hilarious, about Italians, is that we all smell like fish and garlic. Where that one comes from, I have no clue, cause I hate seafood and garlic, let alone all Italian food except pizza and I’m half Italian! So it’s funny to me when someone makes that joke. They aren’t saying them in a harsh, “I fucking mean it!”, kind of manner. They were joking, so yeah, I can take the joke, but blatant, flat out racism…. You better hope I don’t find you.

So hopefully you all learned something valuable about me today and learned something about racism too. That’s the reason why I wrote this blog is to educate a little bit and tell people about my experiences in doing so. So hopefully I made a difference to someone or some people out there with this insightful outlook. Take care everyone!”

This is from my friend’s blog.

When I asked him about it, he said this is all true.

“yeah, so when I say I know what it’s like to be discriminated against, I mean I really know how those people feel cause I went through it.”

It’s sad, pathetic, and disgusting to have even your father and your uncle say that to you.

Am I a racist in Finland?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on February 12, 2009 by sweetangel16175

Am I a racist in Finland?

One of the matters that has surprised me about a social malice such as racism is how such people attempt to hide their real political colors by stating that they are NOT in the nationalistic extreme right but “moderate middle of the roaders” only defending their culture from extinction.

Attempting to give a human face to racism shows, in my opinion, that even those that hold racist ideas know deep inside that it is wrong.

By far the most popular post of Migrant Tales is none other than Are you a target of racism is Finland? In order not to exclude the Finns or any other groups that  find strength and identity through racism, here is a short Migrant Tales “racist meter” that can help you know if you are a racist in Finland:

1) People (especially foreigners/outsiders) who are out of work are lazy
2) I live in an advanced society because we are genetically superior than other groups
3) Foreigners who just work and don´t complain are the only ones that should be allowed to live in Finland
4) Kick out and forbid those cultures that I consider “incompatible” to my values (Muslims, blacks, Russians etc.) from immigrating to Finland
5) Since I am such a superior being, foreigners have to adapt to my values
6) Foreigners are in the same horrid boat as feminists
7) It is ok to exploit a member of another group since he/she is our “guest”
8 Monoculture is a virtue – multiculturalism is a threat
9) If a foreigner is held by the police, it is because he/she is guilty before proven innocent
10) Eila Kännö was right

If you answered YES to any two, the chances are that you are a racist in Finland. If you answered YES to three or more, you are definitely a racist in Finland.

http://nemoo.wordpress.com/2009/02/12/am-i-a-racist-in-finland/

Man asks for forgiveness

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on February 7, 2009 by sweetangel16175

Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., left, walks with Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., …

WASHINGTON – Elwin Wilson was an unabashed racist, the sort who once hung a black doll from a noose outside his home. John Lewis was a young civil rights leader bent on changing laws, if not hearts and minds, even if it cost him his life.

They faced each other at a South Carolina bus station during a protest in 1961. Wilson joined a white gang that jeered Lewis, attacked him and left him bloodied on the ground.

Forty-eight years later, the men met again — this time so Wilson could apologize to Lewis and express regret for his hatred. Lewis, now a congressman from Atlanta, greeted his former tormentor at his Capitol Hill office.

“I just told him that I was sorry,” Wilson, 72, said in a telephone interview Wednesday as he traveled home to Rock Hill, S.C. For years, he said, he tried to block the incident out of his mind “and couldn’t do it.”

Lewis said Wilson is the first person involved in the dozens of attacks against him during the civil rights era to step forward and apologize. When they met Tuesday, Lewis offered forgiveness without hesitation.

“I was very moved,” said Lewis. “He was very, very sincere, and I think it takes a lot of raw courage to be willing to come forward the way he did. … I think it will lead to a great deal of healing.”

Wilson said he had felt an urge to voice his remorse for years. He talked about his past activities a few weeks ago with a friend, and the friend asked him where he thought he might go if he died.

“I said probably hell,” Wilson said. “He said, ‘Well, you don’t have to.'”

Wilson’s apology was first reported by The (Rock Hill, S.C.) Herald. After reading an article about local black civil rights leaders reacting to President Barack Obama’s inauguration, he and another former segregationist called the paper saying they wanted to apologize.

The paper aired their comments and documented an emotional meeting with the local activists at a former whites-only lunch counter in downtown Rock Hill, where Wilson had antagonized demonstrators during a 1961 sit-in.

After meeting with the local activists, Wilson realized that Lewis must have been the young black man he had attacked at the bus station that same year, when a bus carrying two Freedom Riders rolled into town. The riders were Lewis, who is black, and the late Albert Bigelow, who was white. Neither pressed charges over the assault.

Wilson didn’t know that Lewis, who was 21 at the time, had since become one of the most influential Democrats in Congress.

“I never dreamed that a man that I had assaulted, that he would ever be a congressman and that I’d ever see him again,” Wilson said. “He and everybody up there in his office … they were just good people, treated you right and all.”

Lewis and Wilson said they hoped Wilson’s quest for redemption will inspire others who took part in civil rights-era violence to come forward and help heal wounds from the struggle over integration.

“I said if just one person comes forward and gets the hate out of their heart, it’s all worth it,” Wilson said. “But I hope there will be a bunch of people. Life’s short and we all go to the same place when we die.”

Native-American-Hating in “The Wizard of Oz.”

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on January 31, 2009 by sweetangel16175

Indian-Hating in “The Wizard of Oz”

By THOMAS ST. JOHN

Lyman Frank Baum (1856-1919) advocated the extermination of the American Indian in his 1899 fantasy “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Baum was an Irish nationalist newspaper editor, a former resident of Aberdeen in the old Dakota Indian territory. His sympathies with the village pioneers caused him to invent the Oz fantasy to justify extermination. All of Baum’s “innocent” symbols clearly represent easily recognizable frontier landmarks, political realities, and peoples. These symbols were presented to frontier children, to prepare them for their racially violent future.

The Yellow Brick Road represents the yellow brick gold at the end of the Bozeman Road to the Montana gold fields. Chief Red Cloud had forced the razing of several posts, including Fort Phil Kearney, and had forced the signing of the Fort Laramie Treaty. When George Armstrong Custer cut “the Thieves’ Road” during his 1874 gold expedition invasion of the sacred Black Hills, he violated this treaty, and turned U.S. foreign policy toward the Little Big Horn and the Wounded Knee massacre.

The Winged Monkeys are the Irish Baum’s satire on the old Northwest Mounted Police, who were modelled on the Irish Constabulary. The scarlet tunic of the Mounties, and the distinctive “pillbox” forage cap with the narrow visor and strap are seen clearly in the color plate in the 1900 first edition of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Villagers across the Dakota territory heartily despised these British police, especially after 1877, when Sitting Bull retreated across the border and into their protection after killing Custer.

The Shifting Sands, the Deadly Desert, the Great Sandy Waste, and the Impassable Desert are Frank Baum’s reference to that area of the froniter known always as “the great American desert”, west and south of the Great Lakes. Baum creates these fictional, barren areas as protective buffers for his Oz utopia, against hostile, foreign people. This “buffer state” practice had been part of U.S. foreign policy against the Indians, since the earliest colonial days.

The Emerald City of Oz recreates the Irish nationalist’s vision of the Emerald Isle, the sacred land, Ireland, set in this American desert like the sacred Paha Sapa of the Lakota people, these mineral-rich Black Hills floored by coal. Irish settlements in the territories, in Kansas, Nebraska, and Minnesota–at Brule City, Limerick, at Lalla Rookh, and at O’Neill two hundred miles south of Aberdeen–founded invasions of the Black Hills.

The Yellow Winkies, slaves, are Frank Baum’s symbol for the sizable Chinese population in the old West, emigrated for the Union-Pacific railroad, creatures with the slant or winking eyes.

The Deadly Poppy Field is the innocent child’s first sight of opium, that anodyne of choice for pain in the nineteenth century, sold in patent medicines, in the Wizard Oil, at the travelling Indian medicine shows. Baum’s deadly poppies are the poison opium, causing sleep and the fatal dream.

The Wicked Witch of the West is illustrated in the 1900 first edition as a pickaninny, with beribboned, braided pigtails extended comically. Baum repeats the word “brown” in describing her. But this symbol’s real historic depth lies in the earlier Puritans’ confounding of European witches with the equally heathen American Indians.

The orphan Dorothy’s violent removal from Kansas civilization, her search for secret and magical cures for her friends, her capture, enslavement to an evil figure–and the killing of this figure that is forced on her–all these themes Baum takes from the already two hundred year old tradition of the Indian captivity narrative which stoked the fires of Indian-hating and its hope of “redemption through violence”.

In the year immediately following the huge success of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum wrote a fantasy entitled The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus. It is apparent that his frontier experiences were still on his mind. The book was illustrated by Mary Cowles Clark–tomahawks, spears, the hide- covered teepees, and the faces of Indian men, women, and children, and papooses fill the pages and the margins. Baum describes the “rude tent of skins on a broad plain”.

Two crucial chapters are titled “The Wickedness of the Awgwas” and “The Great Battle Between Good and Evil”. The Awgwas represent native Americans: “that terrible race of creatures” and “the wicked tribe”. Baum condemns the Awgwas:

“You are a transient race, passing from life into nothingness. We, who live forever, pity but despise you. On earth you are scorned by all, and in Heaven you have no place! Even the mortals, after their earth life, enter another existence for all time, and so are your superiors.”.

Predictably enough, a few pages later, “all that remained of the wicked Awgwas was a great number of earthen hillocks dotting the plain.” Baum is recalling newspaper photos of the burial field at Wounded Knee.

The Wizard of Oz in 1899 ruling his empire from behind his Barrier of Invisibility evokes the 1869 Imperial Wizard of the Invisible Empire of the South, the Ku Klux Klan. Baum’s figure King Crow and his by-play with the Scarecrow relate to the Jim Crow lynch law at the turn of the century.

Lyman Frank Baum’s overwhelmingly popular fantasy, and the more violent aspects of United States foreign policy, were welded togehter in the American mind for the next century and beyond.
Frank Baum’s widow, at the Hollywood premiere of “The Wizard of Oz” in 1939, complained that the story had been sentimentalized. Indeed, the old and crudely direct political symbols had been removed, and the sweetness poured in–the new U.S. foreign policy demanded more subtle justifications.

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”.

Thomas St. John graduated from Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, and lived in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is the author of “Forgotten Dreams: Ritual in American Popular Art” (New York: The Vantage Press, 1987), a collection of essays on Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The House of the Seven Gables, Reverend Jonathan Edwards’ “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, the black history driving the films “Casablanca” and the cartoon “The Three Little Pigs”, and the Dakota Indian territory symbols in “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. The short book “Nathaniel Hawthorne: Studies in the House of the Seven Gables” is now almost complete and online. He can be reached at: seekingthephoenix@yahoo.com


Weekend Edition June 12 / 13, 2004

http://www.counterpunch.org/stjohn06262004.html