Archive for race

Don’t tell me that racism doesnt still exist…

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when my mom is having problems with a redneck doctor named Evan Jones.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when the only reason this redneck doctor doesn’t want to give her a nurse is because he is racist, even though you should know that being middle eastern or even Muslim, it’s not your race.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when he makes my mom do his work and my mom’s not even complaining.

Don’t tell me he’s sexist either because he treats his wife with the utmost respect and she’s a housewife too.

Don’t tell me that racism still doesn’t exist when he asked my mom why is our president African American, and he’s educated too.

It’s really sad when an educated doctor who makes around $90,000 per year still thinks that way. It angers me and it makes me think there’s no hope for people. It angers me because why would people teach that in the first place. Why is it always an us vs. them mentality? Why must we always divide ourselves and then categorize ourselves into groups and the based on that we set stereotypes to these people and some of them are negative.

The best example is that Muslims are terrorist. The media is an excellent source in perpetuating these stereotypes.

I see the “hate” they have in their eyes, the indifference they have towards us. Yes, I am a foreigner. Yes, I do wear the scarf. But it doesn’t mean I am stupid or don’t know English or even a terrorist.

Why are the stereotypes one dimensional? I mean if you dissect any human being, you won’t find only the heart or the brain or the lungs or the liver. You will find that the human being is very complex, much more complex than even one organ system. So why are the stereotypes one dimensional?

This is how destructive racism is.

My mom quit because they weren’t treating her fairly.

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White Trophy

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

I am sorry, but I feel like I have to address this.

This is to all the African American girls who hate it when an African American guy dates or marries white or a Caucasian woman.

I am sorry that you might feel betrayed by your own race.
I am sorry if you think he has a “white trophy” on his arm.

But you have to know that the African American guy who dates a white girl, there’s nothing wrong with him. The very fact that he is dating a white woman proves that he is human, not that he betrayed your race.

If you actually read your history, you would know that during slavery, they had the one drop rule. It was: a law that if a slave owner raped or had sex with an African American woman, the children she had were still slaves, which means they were still African American, even though they were half white.

I would not be surprised if they still use it today.

So in reality, you should be happy when he marries white because he is bringing more people into your population. He didn’t betray your race. He’s actually adding more people to it.

And don’t you dare think he has a “white trophy” on his arm.

Besides you don’t know her and you have no right to judge her. Even if you did know her, you still have no right to judge her either.

She could be a mean person, but she could also be a really nice, sweet person, but since you didn’t take the time to get to know that, you wouldn’t know that. And I will be feel bad for you.

It’s sad, and I have said this many many many times before, when you judge a person based on the color of their skin or based on if they are really pretty or not, you miss a lot by doing that. I mean a lot.

So again I say please don’t judge me or my friends or anyone else based on what they look like because you’d be very surprised on what you can find.

Does Race Matter?

Posted in race, race is a social concept, racism with tags , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

So my philosophy of race professor posts up a question on their blog.

Does race matter?

He really liked my response. 🙂

Race – (biology) a taxonomic group that is a division of a species; usually arises as a consequence of geographical isolation within a species.

First of all, I don’t believe race is biological. It is based on biological features that are perceived to be different. It is perceived to be different.

If you take off the skin of all the people in the world, you will find out that one person is no different from another person. If you do make it biological, it’s like saying that the African American is a totally different species from the Caucasian, which is not the case.

I had a person comment on my blog last year about why I support interracial dating, saying that the African American and the Caucasian is like a penguin and a polar bear. It’s not true and I did correct him. But it does make me angry.

Taxonomy – a classification of organisms into groups based on similarities of structure or origin.

Second, implying that is a taxonomy, which might be implying that the writer holds Hardimon’s view of race, says that there is a difference between human being, and I totally agree based on the fact that we are all individually different and no one is as unique as I am. But to say that all people who have that shade of skin color think the same or do the same thing is wrong because everybody is different so everybody doesn’t think the same way.

Geographical Isolation is a huge consequence, in my opinion, because it leads to unequal housing, unequal schools, unequal job opportunities, higher health risks, higher abortion rates.

I hold the Haslanger’s view of race, so with that said, I believe that race was invented to divide up human beings based on perceived biological differences and for one “race” to rule another “race”, based on if they are the majority group or minority group, here in the United States.

Race does matter. In politics and sociology, race does matter. Race is all about politics and sociology. I believe that race is used to separate people who are perceived to be different. When stereotypes are added to the equation and the stereotypes are considered bad, it becomes an “us versus them” mentality. We are not them. We don’t have yellow, blue, green, white, or black skin. We are not robbers or thieves or criminals. We are not sexual people. We don’t have babies out of wedlock. We are not terrorists. We don’t oppress our people. We are not them. We separate ourselves from them.

It leads to the minority population in the inner city and the majority population in the suburbs. It leads to the inner city schools and housing are in bad shape, and the suburb schools and housing are in good shape. It leads to the opportunities for the inner city students to go to higher education are worse than the students in the suburbs.

It also leads to Caucasian CEOs and African American workers. It leads to Caucasian slave owners and African American slaves. It leads to Caucasian sharecropper owners and African American and poor Caucasian sharecropper.

In our history, for example, during Jim Crow when it ruled the South, separation didn’t really matter as much as subordination. Subordination is defined as subject to submissive to authority or control of another.

You can still see it today.

I believe that race shouldn’t matter.

It shouldn’t matter if you are blue, green, purple, white, black, brown. It shouldn’t matter if you have nappy hair. It shouldn’t matter if you have a big nose or a small nose.

Just because you have a different texture hair or different eyes shouldn’t mean that you are better or worse than anyone else.

Maybe you are better off because our society gives privilege to the majority group. In the United States, it’s called “white privilege.” Those people who are racialized as “white” have a privilege as Peggy McIntosh in a small article called White Privilege: Unpacking the Knapsack said, “an invisible weightless knapsack of special provisions, maps, passports, codebooks, visas, clothes, tools , and blank checks.”

I sometimes ask myself “Why should I be privileged because I have lighter skin than some people? Why should I have special provisions, maps, passport, codebooks, visas, clothes tools and blank check? What about the other people who don’t have this privilege? Aren’t they human too? Don’t they breathe, eat, study, and play as I do? Why don’t they live in the same houses and go to the same schools?”

Our society gives a lot of emphasis on how you look, from the clothes you wear to how skinny you are, to how tall you are, to many, many things. I believe it’s such a superficial way of looking at things. There’s so much more to a person than they way they look and the way they dress.

This is just my opinion and nobody else has to agree with it.  🙂

Tolerance is good for everyone: an insightful look at racism

Posted in race, racism, racism today with tags , , , on April 15, 2010 by sweetangel16175

“Tolerance is good for everyone: an insightful look at racism
by Josh Chicarelli

WARNING: The following blog contains racial slurs but they’re not used in a racist manner. So don’t take them out of context. They’re used to educate and give some insight into my background for those that don’t know.

You know, it never occurred to me until last night when I was watching comedienne Lisa Lampanelli on Comedy Central. I’ve never touched upon this topic before and some of the stuff I say about myself in here will be the first time that most of yous ever heard it. If you’re familiar with the comedy of Lisa Lampanelli or Carlos Mencia, you’d know that they do a lot of race related material. For instance, Lisa takes every stereotype about every race, sex, and creed and pokes fun at it. Carlos takes these same stereotypes and does the same thing but he puts it in perspective usually. I remember him saying once on his No Strings Attached special that “If you got a joke about a particular group of people, then you have no right to tell that joke unless you can tell that joke to the people that it pokes fun of.” He said this when he was telling a story about how the handicapped called him out on not doing handicap jokes in front of them because he didn’t wanna offend them but he learned first hand that it’s ok to do those jokes for the audiences that it pokes fun of because they have a sense of humor too.

Now with that said, no there will be no race related jokes from me here. I don’t really know if I could ever have the courage that Lisa or Carlos has. Something you all probably don’t know is that I, myself, have been a victim of racism. I can laugh at race related jokes and stuff like many other people when they’re not meant to be mean. Just laughing at the stereotypes that stupid people have pigeonholed on people. But when you attempt a joke that’s cold-hearted and absolutely racist, then there’s where I draw the line.

Imagine being 4-5 years old in kindergarten. Your only friend is a little black girl named Latoya and your so-called father starts calling you a nigger lover and saying shit about, “Do you want people to see you with a nigger? Do you want to be called a nigger lover by the church and everyone else?” Imagine having to go through that at 4 and 5 years old. …..It doesn’t end there. I’ve been dealing with racism my entire life and being a mix of Native American and Italian doesn’t help shit much. My skin is a little bit darker than everyone else’s. When we had those culture days in elementary school, imagine having a teacher, of all people, think you’re making a racist statement when you wear a Native American headdress to class to show off your culture and she doesn’t realize that you are Native American. As for me, I took offense to her doing that because I started feeling discriminated against.

…It still doesn’t end there. Fast forward to a few years ago. I was at my uncle’s house and he made pasta but I had food here that I wanted to eat and I hate pasta. My cousin Andrew asked me why I hated it and before I could get anything out my so-called uncle said this and I quote, “It’s that fuckin’ Indian in him!” I don’t know about you guys that’s reading this, but when he said that to me, I seriously wanted to punch him in the fuckin’ mouth for that. That shit pissed me the fuck off like you wouldn’t believe! Right after that, I just got up, left and walked home from Millersville by Pleasant Valley to Colfax. ….Not done yet people! Many of you know about my love of Asian cinema, food and culture. Well those that know me also know that my eyes don’t open as wide as everyone else’s either and that’s not because I’m Asian cause I’m not. It’s just I don’t have wide eyes. Well by my own father, yet again, I’ve been called chink-eyed, chinky, rice man, and pigeonholed with every Asian stereotype and slur you can imagine.

Because of all of that, I’ve grown to actually downright, not dislike or loathe my dad’s side of the family, but I’ve more or less grown to just hate them with a passion. That’s the Italian side of the family and thankfully I take more after my mom’s side which is the Native American side. They’re more tolerant of everyone and everything probably due to what the Europeans did when they first came here all those years ago and slaughtered our ancestors. Like a couple of years ago, I had a black girlfriend and that side knew about it but I had to keep it a secret from his side of the family to avert more racism.

And you know, there’s something I learned from the few black friends I have. They hate being called African-Americans and I asked them about that once and they told me that it was because they find that political correctness nonsense to be insulting to them. They just wanna be treated like everyone else. They want people to talk to them normally and not try to sound like they’re smarter than them or anyone else because they viewed the political correct terms as more racist than calling them black. I thought that was interesting, but you know, they were right. They are fucking right! If I was black, I’d probably be thinking the same thing.

There’s one thing though, I can’t apply that same way of thinking to being Native American because we actually do prefer to be called Native Americans rather than Indian. It mostly has to do with the fact that Indians are people from India, not people from this country originally. I can make fun of the Native American stereotypes because those don’t bother me that much and they are kinda funny. Like when someone pisses me off and they’re like, “Uh oh, don’t scalp me!” I seriously laugh at that because we don’t scalp people and when they’ve said it to me. Another stereotype I find hilarious, about Italians, is that we all smell like fish and garlic. Where that one comes from, I have no clue, cause I hate seafood and garlic, let alone all Italian food except pizza and I’m half Italian! So it’s funny to me when someone makes that joke. They aren’t saying them in a harsh, “I fucking mean it!”, kind of manner. They were joking, so yeah, I can take the joke, but blatant, flat out racism…. You better hope I don’t find you.

So hopefully you all learned something valuable about me today and learned something about racism too. That’s the reason why I wrote this blog is to educate a little bit and tell people about my experiences in doing so. So hopefully I made a difference to someone or some people out there with this insightful outlook. Take care everyone!”

This is from my friend’s blog.

When I asked him about it, he said this is all true.

“yeah, so when I say I know what it’s like to be discriminated against, I mean I really know how those people feel cause I went through it.”

It’s sad, pathetic, and disgusting to have even your father and your uncle say that to you.

Clarksburg women charged for hate crime

Posted in black and white, concept of racism, conflict, hate crime, identifying against, kkk, racism, racism and the concept of identifying against, racism exists in the united states, racism in america, racism today, the kkk, the klu klux klan, violence, white supremacy with tags , , , , on November 13, 2008 by sweetangel16175
CLARKSBURG, W.Va. — Clarksburg police say a white woman wearing a sheet with “KKK” written on it came out of an apartment building and attacked a 15-year-old black girl on Sunday. The woman is expected to be charged with a hate crime, said Clarksburg Police Chief Marshall Goff. Names were not yet being released, he said.

“She came out of the building and was yelling obscenities and racial stuff at the juvenile,” Goff said. “Charges are pending; she could be served as early as tomorrow.”

Goff said police haven’t ruled out the possibility that the woman has mental problems.

The woman slapped the girl and kicked her in the stomach, he said.

The incident happened outside an apartment building on West Pike Street in downtown Clarksburg, he said.

“The girl was visiting a friend with her mother at the apartment building,” Goff said. “It is a very unusual occurrence in this area. It’s something we are not going to tolerate and will prosecute to the full extent of the law.”

Clarksburg Woman Arrested After Racial Incident
Posted Tuesday, October 7, 2008 ; 06:06 PM


Rebecca Lowe is facing a felony charge. CLARKSBURG — The police have arrested a Clarksburg woman for allegedly yelling racial slurs at a fourteen-year-old black girl.

Officers say the girl was walking past an apartment building on West Pike Street, when Rebecca Lowe, 32, came outside wearing a white sheet over her head.

The sheet had the initials K-K-K written on it in black marker.

They say Lowe slapped and kicked the girl, while yelling the slurs.

Police have charged her with prohibiting the girl’s civil rights.

It is a felony charge.

Lowe was arraigned Tuesday morning and released on $20,000 bond.

 

Why the Americans cant get over race

Posted in african, black and white, concept of race, concept of racism, conflict, identifying against, obama, politicallly correct dream of racism, race, race is a social concept, racism, racism and the concept of identifying against, racism exists in the united states, racism in america, racism today, society, unfair, violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 30, 2008 by sweetangel16175

(CNN) — In 1835, Alexis DeTocqueville, in his seminal work, “Democracy in America,” prophesied that the abolition of slavery would not eliminate racial prejudice, which he declared was “immovable.”

Sen. Barack Obama, in running for the presidency of the United States, is challenging DeTocqueville’s bleak assessment of the human heart. It remains unclear whether the Illinois senator is on a hopeless mission, or whether the American people will decide to make history by breaking with it.

Any discussion of race or racism inevitably stirs uncomfortable reactions. America is, indeed, a nation of immigrants. Most of our ancestors came here in search of a better life. Africans, however, arrived here in chains to make a better life for others. Yet to date, we have been unable to discuss the horrors of the enslavement, lynchings, segregation and degradation of African-Americans without prompting resentment or indifference.

“That’s all in the past,” is a common retort. “We had nothing to do with it. It’s history. Get over it.” The problem, however, as the results in a number of the primary states reveal, is that racial prejudice is not history, and neither whites nor blacks are over it.

While Obama has moved the subject of prejudice out from the shadows, more than his exotic name, origin and religious affiliation are at issue. When Colin Powell, one of America’s most accomplished military leaders and diplomats, contemplated running for the presidency in 2000, his family feared for his safety. Also, during that same year, when Sen. John McCain ran for our highest office, he was the victim of a vile, racist smear in South Carolina.

There are deep grievances held by black Americans over their past and present treatment by the white majority and equally profound resentments held by many whites over what they see as preferential treatment for the black community. Unfortunately, a discussion of the racial divide in our country is too often reduced to sound bites or shouting matches. Moreover, the preachings and exhortations of several prominent religious leaders, rather than nurturing and appealing to our spiritual needs, have instead served to inflame passions and reinforce old falsehoods and antagonisms.

We are convinced that what is needed in America is a serious, open, civil dialogue on racial, ethnic and religious prejudice. To this end, in July, we are convening a conference in Washington on race and reconciliation with political, spiritual and business leaders. Our goal: to further a national conversation about the need for truth, tolerance and reconciliation.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/05/29/cohens.race.politics/index.html?iref=hpmostpop

i dont think it would help much to jut talk about it here! we need to do something more than that!

White privilege = white supremacy?

Posted in identifying against, race, white privilige, white supremacy with tags , , , , , on May 17, 2008 by sweetangel16175

What does it mean to be White?
the white privilge… is that the same as white supremacy?
where the white man is superior to all the other races…
what if theres no such thing as race… would we think the same way?
would we still teach our children to hate people that are not like them?
would we still use the concept of identifying against?
would our children ask why people are different? would they still use the identifying against?
or would they be tolerant, more than us, about race?

the white privilge

1. I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.
do u really wanna do that? having everybody think the same way? and no varitey of thinking?
you could be missing about a lot by doing that, because there could be an african american or an asian with better, more inventive ideas.

2. I can avoid spending time with people whom I was trained to mistrust and who have learned to mistrust my kind or me.
i would disagree with that because if a white man hangs out with an afican american man, hypothetically, the white man would also be trained to mistrust the african american man. 

3. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live.
wealth and status, the stereotype that the african american community is poor and white american community is rich

4. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.
unless you were born a bitch! then they might think of you as the opposite

5. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.

6. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented.
the saddest thing too…

7. When I am told about our national heritage or about “civilization,” I am shown that people of my color made it what it is.

8. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race.

9. If I want to, I can be pretty sure of finding a publisher for this piece on white privilege.

10. I can be pretty sure of having my voice heard in a group in which I am the only member of my race.

11. I can be casual about whether or not to listen to another person’s voice in a group in which s/he is the only member of his/her race.
ouch!

12. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser’s shop and find someone who can cut my hair.

13. Whether I use checks, credit cards or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of financial reliability.

14. I can arrange to protect my children most of the time from people who might not like them.
not the best idea in the world…

15. I do not have to educate my children to be aware of systemic racism for their own daily physical protection.

16. I can be pretty sure that my children’s teachers and employers will tolerate them if they fit school and workplace norms; my chief worries about them do not concern others’ attitudes toward their race.
unless your child is a total bitch and gets out of his/her seat every once in a while. 

17. I can talk with my mouth full and not have people put this down to my color.

18. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty or the illiteracy of my race.

19. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial.

20. I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race.

21. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.

22. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of color who constitute the world’s majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.

23. I can criticize our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behavior without being seen as a cultural outsider.

24. I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the “person in charge”, I will be facing a person of my race.

25. If a traffic cop pulls me over or if the IRS audits my tax return, I can be sure I haven’t been singled out because of my race.

26. I can easily buy posters, post-cards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys and children’s magazines featuring people of my race.

27. I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared.

28. I can be pretty sure that an argument with a colleague of another race is more likely to jeopardize her/his chances for advancement than to jeopardize mine.

29. I can be pretty sure that if I argue for the promotion of a person of another race, or a program centering on race, this is not likely to cost me heavily within my present setting, even if my colleagues disagree with me.

30. If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn’t a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have.

31. I can choose to ignore developments in minority writing and minority activist programs, or disparage them, or learn from them, but in any case, I can find ways to be more or less protected from negative consequences of any of these choices.

32. My culture gives me little fear about ignoring the perspectives and powers of people of other races.

33. I am not made acutely aware that my shape, bearing or body odor will be taken as a reflection on my race.

34. I can worry about racism without being seen as self-interested or self-seeking.

35. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having my co-workers on the job suspect that I got it because of my race.

36. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it had racial overtones.

37. I can be pretty sure of finding people who would be willing to talk with me and advise me about my next steps, professionally.

38. I can think over many options, social, political, imaginative or professional, without asking whether a person of my race would be accepted or allowed to do what I want to do.

39. I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race.

40. I can choose public accommodation without fearing that people of my race cannot get in or will be mistreated in the places I have chosen.

41. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help, my race will not work against me.

42. I can arrange my activities so that I will never have to experience feelings of rejection owing to my race.

43. If I have low credibility as a leader I can be sure that my race is not the problem.

44. I can easily find academic courses and institutions which give attention only to people of my race.

45. I can expect figurative language and imagery in all of the arts to testify to experiences of my race.

46. I can chose blemish cover or bandages in “flesh” color and have them more or less match my skin.

47. I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us.

48. I have no difficulty finding neighborhoods where people approve of our household.

49. My children are given texts and classes which implicitly support our kind of family unit and do not turn them against my choice of domestic partnership.

50. I will feel welcomed and “normal” in the usual walks of public life, institutional and social.

http://mylifeasanalien.wordpress.com/2008/05/14/what-does-it-mean-to-be-white-or-act-white/