Archive for the categorizing people Category

Racism Unfiltered in France

Posted in black and white, categorizing people, classifying people, colorblind racism, concept of racism, identifying against, ignorance, ignorance of people, race, racism, racism in france, racism today, Uncategorized with tags , , , on November 16, 2008 by sweetangel16175

If the problem of racism in American discourse is typified by the N-word outburst of comedian Michael Richards followed by his abject apology, the French variant is altogether more toxic. The latest outrage came from second-string TV personality and self-appointed social commentator Pascal Sevran, whose recently published book included the obscenely racist idea that the “black [penis] is responsible for famine in Africa.” Elaborating in a newspaper interview, Sevran said, “Africa is dying from all the children born there” to parents supposedly too sexually undisciplined or dumb to realize they could not feed them all. The answer to the problem? “We need sterilize half the planet,” Sevran emphatically replied. Known as an relentless attention-seeker, the defiant Sevran drew only limited fire for his comments, and a public rebuke from his public television employer — though not the cancellation of his Sunday program that many demanded. Appalled at the light punishment, the government of Niger (itself a victim of recent famines) announced it would file libel charges against Sevran in French courts.

Sevran’s prurient opinions are but the latest addition to the growing racist chatter in the French mainstream. A month earlier, a Socialist political kingpin in the Montpellier region sparked fury — and possible expulsion from the party — by lamenting that France’s national soccer team fielded “9 blacks out of 11” starting players. “I’m ashamed of this country,” in which “the whites are lousy,” he groused, and would soon be fielding teams “where all 11 players are black.” That echoed a comment a year earlier by philosopher Alain Finkelkraut, who — seeking to explain the 2005 rioting by youths descended from immigrants in France’s suburbs — made allusion to France’s “white-black-Arab” soccer side that won the 1998 World Cup and became an icon of French social integration. ” Today, [the team is] black-black-black, and it’s the laughingstock of Europe,” Finkelkraut complained.

Even some black Frenchmen have joined the bigoted chorus: In November, the black comic known as Dieudonn� made a conspicuous appearance at the annual congress of Jean-Marie Le Pen’s National Front party — much to the pleasure of extreme-rightists looking to lose their racist stigma without changing their xenophobic positions. For the last two years, the self-described leftist Dieudonn� had outdone even Le Pen in Jew-baiting, delivering a series of brazenly anti-Semitic remarks, belittling the Holocaust and depicting Jews as racist persecutors of blacks and Arabs. Though that earned him general condemnation, Dieudonn�’s high-profile fraternizing with a party treated as a pariah by most French minorities and voters indicated that he, too, was looking for a more effective manner to promote his divisive positions. His flirtation with Le Pen found support from Ahmed Moualek, a blogger and influential voice from France’s blighted suburban housing projects who said he’d rather debate with “an intelligent racist than with a stupid anti-racist,” noting that while Le Pen’s “language can at times shock people, he’s an honest man.”

The rising torrent of racist language and publicly expressed racist attitudes may be a sign less that racism is spreading, than that the boundaries of mainstream tolerance are changing. As in the U.S., France has seen an increase in provocative shock content in entertainment and commentary, whether for comic effect or political impact. Interior Minister and presidential hopeful Nicolas Sarkozy drew protests when he used a racially loaded term to denounce young men rioting in the suburbs last year — an outcry that also coincided with his jump in polls. The street patois of those ethnically diverse projects, meanwhile, has also long contained its own racially aggressive “shock” element, with the rejoinder “ta race” (your race) a kind of generic, all-purpose slight. Clearly, the political “filter” in the U.S. public square that prompts a Michael Richards or a Mel Gibson to grovel apologetically following publicly recorded racial insults is considerably less developed in France. Indeed, last year’s riots were a stark reminder of how poorly France has done in integrating its diversity, remaining locked in an officially “color-blind” national ideology that often simply avoids confronting the problems of racial inequality. France counts no blacks or Arabs as members of parliament, and its corporate boardrooms don’t fare much better.

France rejects affirmative action as incompatible with its republican ideals of color-blind equality for all citizens. Nice in theory, but that’s not working in practice: discrimination continues, inequality is rife, and notions of color-blindness don’t square with the rising chorus of racially loaded commentary. Color-blindness may also function to keep France blind to racial discrimination and inequality, but the rising tide of anger in the projects and racist chatter in the mainstream suggests that the French may soon have no choice but to openly confront what color-blindness prefers not to see.

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Why is France Burning?

Posted in african, anger, anti-islamism, black and white, categorizing people, children suffering, classifying people, concept of racism, crimes against humanity, discrimination, forms of racism, hate, identifying against, ignorance, ignorance of people, images in the media, islam, islam and violence, lack of understanding, muslim, muslim is not a race, muslims, muslims are not terrorist, no respect, police brutality, politicallly correct dream of racism, prejudice, race, race is a social concept, racism, racism and the concept of identifying against, racism in france, racism today, stereotypes, stereotypes of islam, terrorism, violence, violence and islam with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 16, 2008 by sweetangel16175

WHY IS FRANCE BURNING?

WHY IS FRANCE BURNING?

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Saturday night was the 10th day of the spreading youth riots that have much of France in flames — and it was the worst night ever since the first riot erupted in a suburban Paris ghetto of low-income housing, with 1295 vehicles — from private cars to public buses — burned last night, a huge jump from the 897 set afire the previous evening. And, for the first time, the violence born in the suburban ghettos last night invaded the center of Paris — some 40 vehicles were set alight in Le Marais (the pricey home to the most famous gay ghetto in Paris, around the Place de la Republique nearby, and in the bourgeois 17th arrondissement, only a stone’s throw from the dilapidated ghetto of the Goutte d’Or in the 18th arrondissement.

 

As someone who lived in France for nearly a decade, and who has visited those suburban ghettos, where the violence started, on reporting trips any number of times, I have not been surprised by this tsunami of inchoate youth rebellion that is engulfing France. It is the result of thirty years of government neglect: of the failure of the French political classes — of both right and left — to make any serious effort to integrate its Muslim and black populations into the larger French economy and culture; and of the deep-seated, searing, soul-destroying racism that the unemployed and profoundly alienated young of the ghettos face every day of their lives, both from the police, and when trying to find a job or decent housing.

 

To understand the origins of this profound crisis for France, it is important to step back and remember that the ghettos where festering resentment has now burst into flames were created as a matter of industrial policy by the French state.

 

If France’s population of immigrant origin — mostly Arab, some black — is today quite large (more than 10% of the total population), it is because there was a government and industrial policy during the post-World War II boom years of reconstruction and economic expansion which the French call “les trentes glorieuses” — the 30 glorious years — to recruit from France’s foreign colonies laborers and factory and menial workers for jobs which there were no Frenchmen to fill. These immigrant workers were desperately needed to allow the French economy to expand due to the shortage of male manpower caused by two World Wars, which killed many Frenchmen, and slashed the native French birth-rates too. Moreover, these immigrant workers were considered passive and unlikely to strike (unlike the highly political French working class and its Communist-led unions.) This government-and-industry-sponsored influx of Arab workers (many of whom saved up to bring their families to France from North Africa) was reinforced following Algerian independence by the Harkis.

 

The Harkis (whose story is movingly told by Dalila Kerchouche in her Destins de Harkis) were the native Algerians who fought for and worked with France during the post-war anti-colonial struggles for independence — and who for their trouble were horribly treated by France. Some 100,000 Harkis were killed by the Algerian FLN (National Liberation Front) after the French shamelessly abandoned them to a lethal fate when the French occupying army evacuated itself and the French colonists from Algeria. Moreover, those Harki families who were saved, often at the initiative of individual military commanders who refused to obey orders not to evacuate them, once in France were parked in unspeakable, filthy, crowded concentration camps for many long years and never benefited from any government aid — a nice reward for their sacrifices for France, of which they were, after all, legally citizens. Their ghettoized children and grandchildren, naturally, harbor certain resentments.

 

France’s other immigrant workers were warehoused in huge, high-rise low-income housing ghettos — known as “cités” (Americans would say “the projects”) — specially built for them, and deliberately placed out of sight in the suburbs around most of France’s major urban agglomerations, so that their darker-skinned inhabitants wouldn’t pollute the center cities of Paris, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Nice and the others of white France’s urban centers today encircled by flames. Often there was only just enough public transport provided to take these uneducated working class Arabs and blacks directly to their jobs in the burgeoning factories of the “peripherique” — the suburban peripheries that encircled Paris and its smaller sisters — but little or none linking the ghettos to the urban centers.

 

Now 30, 40, and 50 years old, these high-rise human warehouses in the isolated suburbs are today run-down, dilapidated, sinister places, with broken elevators that remain unrepaired, heating systems left dysfunctional in winter, dirt and dog-shit in the hallways, broken windows, and few commercial amenities — shopping for basic necessities is often quite limited and difficult, while entertainment and recreational facilities for youth are truncated and totally inadequate when they’re not non-existent. Both apartments and schools are over-crowded (birth control is a cultural taboo in the Muslim culture the immigrants brought with them and transmitted to their children, and even for their male grandchildren of today — who’ve adopted hip-hop culture and created their own French-language rap music of extraordinary vitality (which often embodies stinging social and political content) — condoms are a no-no because of Arab machismo, contributing to rising AIDS rates in the ghettos.

 

The first week in December will mark the 22nd anniversary of the Marche des Beurs (Beur means Arab in French slang). I was present to see the cortege of 100,000 arrive in Paris — it was the Franco-Arab equivalent of Dr. Martin Luther King’s 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Justice The Marche des Beurs was organized from Lyon’s horrific, enormous suburban high-rise ghetto, Les Minguettes, with the help of a charismatic left-wing French Catholic worker-priest, Father Christian Delorme, and its central theme was the demand to be recognized as French “comme les autres” — like everyone else … a demand, in sum, for complete integration. But for the mass of Franco-Arabs, little has changed since 1983 — and the integrationist movement of “jeunes beurs” created around that march petered out in frustration and despair. In recent years, its place has been taken by Islamist fundamentalists operating through local mosques — the mediatic symbol of this retreat into a separatist, communitarian-religious politics is the slick demagogue Tariq Ramadan, a philosophy professor who uses one cosmetically democratic discourse when he’s speaking on French TV, and a fiery, hard-line fundamentalist discourse in the Arab-language cassettes of his speeches that sell like hotcakes to Franco-Arab ghetto youth. (Ramadan’s double language has been meticulously documented by the Arab-speaking journalist Caroline Fourest in her book published last fall by Editions Grasset, “Frere Tariq: discourse, methode et strategie de Tariq Ramadan,” extracts from which have been published in the weekly l’Express.) But the current rebellion has little to do with Islamic fundamentalism.

 

In 1990, Francois Mitterrand — the Socialist President then — described what life was like for jobless ghetto youths warehoused in the overcrowded “cités”:

 

“What hope does a young person have who’s been born in a quartier without a soul, who lives in an unspeakably ugly high-rise, surrounded by more ugliness, imprisoned by gray walls in a gray wasteland and condemned to a gray life, with all around a society that prefers to look away until it’s time to get mad, time to FORBID.”

 

Well, Mitterrand’s perceptive and moving words remained just that — words — for his urban policy was an underfunded, unfocussed failure that only put a few band-aids on a metastasizing cancer — and 15 years after Mitterrand’s diagnosis, the hopelessness and alienation of these ghetto youths and their “gray lives” has only become deeper and more rancid still.

 

The response to the last ten days of violent youth rebellion by the conservative government has been inept and tone-deaf. For the first four days of the rebellion, Chirac and his Prime Minister, Dominique de Villepin decided to let the hyper-ambitious, megalomaniacal Interior Minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, lead the government’s response to the youth’s violence and arson. Chirac and Villepin detest Sarkozy, who has been openly campaigning to replace Chirac as president in 2007 (Villepin was made P.M. in the hopes that he could block Sarkozy for the right’s presidential nomination), The President and his P.M. thought that “Sarko,” as he’s commonly referred to in France — who won his widespread popularity as a hardline, law-and-order demagogue on the issue of domestic insecurity — would be unable to stop the violence, and thus damage his presidential campaign.

 

But Sarkozy only poured verbal kerosene on the flames, dismissing the ghetto youth in the most insulting and racist terms and calling for a policy of repression. “Sarko” made headlines with his declarations that he would “karcherise” the ghettos of “la racaille“– words the U.S. press has utterly inadequately translated to mean “clean” the ghettos of “scum.” But these two words have an infinitely harsher and insulting flavor in French. “Karcher” is the well-known brand name of a system of cleaning surfaces by super-high-pressure sand-blasting or water-blasting that very violently peals away the outer skin of encrusted dirt — like pigeon-shit — even at the risk of damaging what’s underneath. To apply this term to young human beings and proffer it as a strategy is a verbally fascist insult and, as a policy proposed by an Interior Minister, is about as close as one can get to hollering “ethnic cleansing” without actually saying so. It implies raw police power and force used very aggressively, with little regard for human rights. I wonder how many Anglo-American correspondents get the inflammatory, terribly vicious flavor of the word in French? The translation of “karcherise” by “clean” just misses completely the inflammatory violence of what Sarko was really saying. And “racaille” is infinitely more pejorative than “scum” to French-speakers — it has the flavor of characterizing an entire group of people as subhuman, inherently evil and criminal, worthless, and is, in other words, one of the most serious insults one could launch at the rebellious ghetto youth.

 

As the rebellion has spread beyond the Paris suburbs as far south as Marseilles and Nice and as far north as Lille, Sarkozy has been thundering that the spreading violence is centrally “organized.” But on the telephone this morning from Paris, the dean of French investigative reporters — Claude Angeli, editor of Le Canard Enchaine — told me, “That’s not true — this isn’t being organized by the Islamist fundamentalists, as Sarkozy is implying to scare people. Sure, kids in neighborhoods are using their cellphones and text messages to warn each other where the cops are coming so they can move and pick other targets for their arson. But the rebellion is spreading because the youth have a sense of solidarity that comes from watching television — they imitate what they’re seeing, and they sense themselves targeted by Sarkozy’s inflammatory rhetoric. The rebellion is spreading spontaneously — driven especially by racist police conduct that is the daily lot of these youths. It’s incredible the level of police racism — they’re arrested or controlled and have their papers checked because they have dark skins, and the police are verbally brutal, calling them ‘bougnoules’ [a racist insult, something like the American “towel-heads”, only worse] and telling them, ‘Lower your eyes! Lower your eyes!’ as if they had no right to look a policeman in the face. It’s utterly dehumanizing. No wonder these kids feel so divorced from authority.”

 

A team report in today’s French daily, Liberation (where I was once a columnist), interviews ghetto youths, and asks them to explain the reasons for their anger. And, the paper reports, “All, or almost all, cite ‘Sarko’….a 22-year old student says, ‘Sarkozy owes us his excuses for what he said. When I see what’s happened, I come back to the same image: Sarkozy when he went to Argenteuil, raising his head and thundering, Madame, we’re going to clean all that up. Result? Sarko sent every body over the top, he showed a total disrespect toward everybody” in the ghetto.” A 13-year-old tells the Liberation reporters: “‘It’s us who are going to put Sarkozy through the Karcher…Will I be out making trouble tonight?’ He smiles and says, ‘that’s classified information.'” Another 28-year-old youth: “Who’s setting the fires? They’re kids between 14 and 22, we don’t really know who they are because they put on masks, don’t talk, and don’t brag about it the next day … but instead of fucking everything up where they live, it would be better if they held a demo, or went and fucked up the people and the stores in Paris. We’ve got minister, Sarko, who says ‘You’re all the same.’ Me, I say non, we all say non — but in reply we still get, ‘You’re all the same.’ That response from the government creates something in common between all of us, a kind of solidarity. These kids want to get attention, to let people know they exist. So, they same to themselves, ‘If we get nasty and create panic, they won’t forget us, they’ll know we’re in a neighborhood where we need help.”

 

Yesterday, when Sarkozy — who is Minister of Religion as well as Interior Minister — wanted to make an appearance at the Catholic Bishops’ conference in Paris, they refused to let him speak — and instead, the Bishops issued a ringing statement denouncing “those who would call for repression and instill fear” instead of responding to the economic, social, and racial causes of the riots. This was an unusually sharp rebuke directed squarely at Sarkozy.

 

Under the headline “Budget Cuts Exasperate Suburban Mayors,” Le Monde reports today on how Chirac and his conservatives have compounded 30 years of neglect of the ghettos by slashing even deeper into social programs: 20% annual cuts in subsidies for neighborhood groups that work with youths since 2003, cuts in youth job-training programs and tax credits for hiring ghetto youth, cuts in education and programs to teach kids how to read and write, cuts in neighborhood police who get to know ghetto kids and work with them (when Sarkozy went to Toulouse, he told the neighborhood police: “You’re job is not to be playing soccer with these kids, your job is to arrest them!”) With fewer and fewer neighborhood cops to do preventive work that defuses youth alienation and violence, the alternative is to wait for more explosions and then send in the CRS (Compagnies Republicaines de Securite, hard-line paramilitary SWAT teams). Budget cuts for social programs plus more repression, is a prescription for more violence.

 

That’s why Le Monde‘s editorial today warned that a continuation of this blind policy creates a big risk of provoking a repeat of 2002, when the neo-fascist Jean-Marie Le Pen made it into the runoff.

 

And a majority of the country, empoisoned even more by racism after the violence of the last ten days, seems willing to accept more and more repression: a poll released last night on France 2 public TV shows that 57% of the French support Nicolas Sarkozy’s hard-line approach to the ghetto youths’ rebellion, now spreading right across France. Sarko’s demagogy seems to be working — at least with the electorate — but it won’t stop the violence, it will only increase it.

 

 

Doug Ireland, a longtime radical journalist and media critic, runs the blog DIRELAND, where this article appeared Nov. 6, 2005.

Why can we not categorize people!

Posted in categorizing people with tags on June 3, 2008 by sweetangel16175

We use appearance to categorize people and then we come up with these categories and put people in them, so life can be more simple to us. We think everyone with the same appearance is the same and should be put in the same category and so that’s how stereotypes to these categories are formed. We think everyone that looks the same acts in the same way. They must all act the same because they all are the same, right?

 

You cant put people into categories because people are so much more complex.

They have a mind, emotion, thought. They have so much more than hands to hold thing and legs to walk and run with. They have so much more than a heart to beat and lungs to breathe with.

They are so much more than just bad and good. We have three demonsions for a reason, it shows that even the good people are not completely good and the bad people are not completely bad.

 

You are so much more than just emo, or muslim, or african american.

You’re not just an emo, but you’re could be the sweetest person.

And nobody will ever know because your stereotype is that you cut and you’re want to commit suicide because you’re so depressed.

You’re not just a muslim, but you could be the smartest or the wisest person in the world.

But nobody will ever know because your stereotype is that you kill the infidel and that you’re a terrorist and that women are so oppressed.

You’re not just an african american, but you could be the most practical person.

But nobody will know that because your stereotype is that you either rob people and a ganster or you’re too lazy to work.

There’s so much more to people than the categories we put them in.

Marching For Emo

Posted in attacking emo, categorizing people, classifying people, cliques, cliques in school, clothes, conflict, dont judge, emo, emo music, emos, emotional, fairness, goths, happiness, identifying against, ignorance, ignorance of people, media, music, society, society norms, sociology, speaking out, stereotypes, stereotypes of emo, stereotypes of emos, stereotypes of goths, the concept of emo, unfair, violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2008 by sweetangel16175

Marching For Emo

Posted Fri May 30 11:35am PDT by Dan Martin in The NME Blog

 

The suicide of 13-year-old Hannah Bond was a tragedy, but emo music is not to blame. And tomorrow, an estimated thousand music fans will march on the offices of a U.K. newspaper in an attempt to point that out.

Emo music, and My Chemical Romance in particular, have been under an unpleasant spotlight in the U.K. this month since a depressed teenager from Kent took her own life. And the fact that she was a fan of the genre has been blamed.

The scapegoating of alternative music in the press is nothing new. But what’s all the more disturbing about this case is that the coroner singled out the emo genre as playing a part in Hannah’s death. Roger Sykes said, “The emo overtones concerning death and associating it with glamour I find very disturbing.”

This was all the Daily Mail newspaper needed to revive their crusade against a culture that actually has much more to do with uniting people and sending a message of hope. Nevertheless, they whipped up another editorial about this apparent “suicide cult” designed to panic parents, even going as far as to make inaccurate claims that MCR’s “Black Parade” is “a place where all emos believe they go when they die.”

http://www.nme.com/news/various-artists/36468

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-566481/Why-child-safe-sinister-cult-emo.html

My Chemical Romance spoke up because they had to, sending condolences to Hannah’s family, but pointing out that: “My Chemical Romance are and always have been vocally anti-violence and anti-suicide. As a band, we have always made it our missions through our actions to provide comfort, support, and solace to our fans.

“The message and theme of our album The Black Parade is hope and courage. Our lyrics are about finding the strength to keep living through pain and hard times. The last song on our album states, ‘I am not afraid to keep on living’–a sentiment that embodies the band’s position on hardships we all face as human beings.”

The Daily Mail whipping up fear and misunderstanding is nothing new either, but the fans who feel this music has helped them through their problems, not exacerbated them, are not standing for it.

Tomorrow, an estimated thousand fans will march upon the newspaper’s London offices, in a show of solidarity, and respect for Hannah. Organizer Anni Smith told NME.com: “The [Daily Mail ‘s] words ‘suicide cult’ really stand out for me, because it’s just so far from the truth. As a fanbase it’s such an insult because we fight so hard and so many of us suffer from depression, and we fight every day to ward it off.

“The way [many teenagers are] fighting it is with My Chemical Romance’s help and it’s just such an insult to tell us that the last thing we have to hold on to and the last thing that’s keeping us alive is killing us, because it’s not.”

NME.com will be at the march tomorrow.

http://www.nme.com/news/my-chemical-romance/36848

this is one of the song that they are blaming!

the black parade.

When I was a young boy,
My father took me into the city
To see a marching band.
He said,
“Son when you grow up, will you be the saviour of the broken,
The beaten and the damned?”
He said
“Will you defeat them, your demons, and all the non believers, the plans that they have made?”
Because one day I’ll leave you,
A phantom to lead you in the summer,
To join the black parade.”

When I was a young boy,
My father took me into the city
To see a marching band.
He said,
“Son when you grow up, will you be the saviour of the broken,
The beaten and the damned?”

Sometimes I get the feeling she’s watching over me.
And other times I feel like I should go.
Went through it all, the rise and fall, the bodies in the streets.
And when you’re gone we want you all to know


We’ll Carry on,
We’ll Carry on
And though you’re dead and gone believe me
Your memory will carry on
Carry on
We’ll carry on
And in my heart I cant contain it
The anthem wont explain it.

A world that sends you reeling from decimated dreams
Your misery and hate will kill us all
So paint it black and take it back
Let’s shout it loud and clear
Defiant to the end we hear the call

To carry on
We’ll carry on
And though you’re dead and gone believe me
Your memory will carry on
We’ll carry on
And though you’re broken and defeated
Your weary widow marches on

And on we carry through the fears
Oh oh oh
Disappointed faces of your peers
Oh oh ohh
Take a look at me cause
I could not care at all
Do or die
You’ll never make me
Cause the world will never take my heart
You can try, you’ll never break me
We want it all,
I’m gonna play this part
I won’t explain or say i’m sorry
I’m unashamed,
I’m gonna show my scar
Give a cheer, for all the broken
Listen here, because it’s who we are
I’m just a man,
I’m not a hero
Just a boy, who had to sing this song
Just a man,
I’m not a hero
I Don’t Care!

We’ll carry on
We’ll carry on
Though you’re dead and gone believe me
Your memory will carry on
We’ll carry on
And though you’re broken and defeated

You’re weary widow marches on

Do or die
You’ll never make me
Cause the world will never take my heart
You can try, you’ll never break me
We want it all,
[We’ll carry on]
I’m gonna play this part

Do or die
[We’ll carry on]
You’ll never make me
[We’ll carry on]
Cause the world will never take my heart
You can try,
[We’ll carry on]
You’ll never break me
We want it all,
[We’ll carry on]
I’m gonna play this part
[We’ll carry on]
We’ll carry on!

some comments on the topic

“I’m 59 and a big music fan — everything from swing and the Beatles to show tunes and Counting Crows. Music is a source of great comfort and joy for millions of people. People in positions of authority and responsibility often prefer to look for scapegoats rather than solutions, and popular music is a favorite one. The death of this young woman is a tragedy and not something for a newspaper to use to sell papers and stir up a phony controversy. Instead, they should be asking why teens feel so hopeless — why they have no place to turn to when depressed. They should be pushing for funding to set up more hotlines and free counseling services — to train teachers and parents to look for warning signs — to encourage adults to reach out to kids and let them know that someone cares. As other people have noted, music is sometimes the one thing that keeps a person going on in times of trouble. To condemn a type of music as a causative factor in suicide is just ridiculous.”

“Well first of all, let me just express how incompetent and uneducated the person who wrote this sounds. “Emo is a genre of music, not a type of person. Also, the My Chemical Romance album titled “The Black Parade” is considered “alternative” NOT “emo!” On of the things that bothers me the most is when people who do not have any exposure of affiliation with the subculture of the people who feel “emo”(which is just short for EMOtional) automatically think that they can relate and know everything that goes through the mind of one of these people. They cannot relate at all, and have no idea what goes through their heads. And if the girl was suicidal, there were obviously signs, that the girl’s friends and family should have been able to spot. Instead of blaming it in a band, maybe you could blame it on something realistic, like depression. The band, My Chemical Romance, has always had a very positive message to bring. They have never supported self harm, violence, suicide, or anything of that nature. At the end of the “Teenagers” music video, they state, “Violence is never the answer. If you feel like acting out, reach out. Go to NATIONALSAVE.ORG or any other youth violence prevention source for information on ho how find an alternative to violence.” They also to not affiliate themselves with the ’emo culture in any way.'”

“This is the biggest load of bull there ever was. My Chemical Romance, nor any alternative rock band is to blame for her committing suicide. MCR is about NOT bending to your darkest desires and taking the ‘easy way’ out. They show that its cowardly to end your life, instead of the other way around like other people make it seem. If you actually listen to ‘Teenagers’, Gerard is singing about how other adults with leave teenagers alone if they ‘darken their clothes’ but he won’t. They formed because Gerard was so moved by 9-11. In interviews, he states that their goal as a band is to save kids lives. I know that they helped save mine. No, I never cut myself, but I’ve thought about suicide, probably too much for shrink’s comfort. Listening them really helped me realize that not everyone in the world is so screwed and messed up as I thought. I mean, you look at pop stars who don’t sing about serious issues and you see them dancing around in their underwear high on coke. I don’t think thats an apprtopriate message. If they need to blame someone for her suicide, then they need to look to the people she actually saw everyday. If she had to look completely to music and twist it into a dark message, then where in the hell were her parents? They obviously failed to get her help, same with her siblings and peers. I know how it feels to be a loner, and ignored by family, but you don’t go drown yourself with false damning messages. ”

“To speak against a genre of music because of the choices of one individual is wrong. Case in point: the Columbine High School shootings. There are parents out there who continue to blame the music that the shooters listened to as the cause. The cause was total alienation and shunning from their peers. It’s probably the same for any suicide, what was going on around Hannah that would drive her to so desperate an act? Who was supposed to be looking out for her? Don’t blame the music, muic is a gift, a joy, and can grant a cathartic release. We are defined by our choices, not by a genre, so can MCR be blamed? No, for they have nothing to do with the choices of one girl, one of billions of people who have access to the music.”

“This kind of makes me want to flip out. People kill themselves of their own free will, I’m so sorry it happened but likely this girl turned toward her music to comfort her and find something she could relate to. Music and, especially MCR enhances my life. I have never known a person who didn’t find solace in their favorite music. Beside which music is so not the issue, people aren’t the music they listen to, they can’t be boiled down to “Emo” or “goth”, people are complex. Certainly music is a part of everyone’s life, but a much bigger part is family, friends school, if people want answers they should look to these. The truth is nobody will ever know why becasue the one person who knows is gone, it’s done and any search for answers is based on wild guess work which will create blame and wrongful judgments.”

The media and what not are just looking for someone to blame. Since the only person they can find out the truth from is Hannnah (and they can’t) they blame the obvious. This is what she looks like. People automatically think that because she has thick eyeliner on and listens to MCR she will slit her wrists and kill herself. when non-emo people kill themselves do they blame their music? NO! So they should stop hitting on emo’s and take a look at the real world and not blame 1 band and 1 type of music!!!”

“first of all, emo has nothing to do with death or the idea of it. when the emo genre started in the late 80’s it was a group of punk musicians who instead of writing lyrics about politics and anarchy they wrote about deeper emotions; hence emo. The fact that emo is a term coined for the dark and depressed now is as much a shame as this girl taking her life. The emo scene as it was originally is dead thanks to bands and people who cant come up with their own original ideas anymore.”

My Chemical Romance is a band that wants to save your life. Anyone who is a fan knows that. Parents want to blame the music because it’s eaiser than admitting that they couldn’t see that their child needed help before it was too late.  If I lived in the UK I would be protesting too.”

“Reading this article makes me think how much people love to hate. I mean some people that dont even like this band support this march. Why? Cuz it’s stupid how people can just blame music or even a band for a little girls death. Music has nothing to do with it. She died cuz of her own reasons not stupid ones like the english are making it to be. I’m personally a fan of MCR when im done i listen to them to make me feel better they need to listen to their music in order for then to state something stupid like this.”

“Firstly let me just thank you for bringing this to the American public’s attention. As others have stated it’s the same false conjecture that has happened over and over. Music was probably the one thing that poor girl had to turn to and instead of looking at peer groups, bullying etc., they take the easy way out and scapegoat music they can’t understand. Same old story. But I’m glad to see the younger generation organize and fight to be heard!”

“I think this is absolutely ridiculous. As a fan of MCR i know that the band members have been through tough times and that they don’t want anyone to deal with pain, and they encourage living not death. Saying that music can control someones life is ludacris and their actions are completely their own. Rock on MCR and stay strong!”

“I am deeply saddened by the death of Hannah bond but you don’t need to blame our wonderful heros my chemical romance who are PURLEY ANTI-VIOLENCE.
THEIR MUSIC HELPS US DEAL WITH LIFES UP’S AND DOWNS BETTER.
THAT WHY WE LISTEN TO IT AND BELIEVE IN IT SOOO MUCH.

I read the reviews back in 2006 when the black parade was released and and it got nothing but positive feedback from fans all over the world and that what made me believe that there is hope for this genre that they saved.
I was lucky enough to see them in concert twice and THEY ALWAYS SAY NO TO VIOLENCE AND THEY TELL US TO MOSH SAFELY AND PICK UP OUR FELLOW MEN IF THEY FALL INTO THE MOSH PIT.
So it’s purely not their fault that she died.
Please don’t blame this tragedy on them they did nothing wrong all they do is HELP US and thats the only crime they are guilty of is HELPING US GET THROUGH LIFE ALVIE.

“i think its wrong that anybody would blame anything on music. Its the parents fault!! and MCR is meant for encourgement, and they are NOT emo, i cant even tell you how many effing times Gerard as said ‘MCR is not an emo band’ and if people would stop judging the music, and blaming them and really listened, they would see that!!! but no, people have to be so naive as to think ‘blame the music, JUST because it sounds dark and creepy!’ its their fault because they are so blind as not to see the real problem. And i just absolutley ‘love’ the way this article states people with issues, serious issues like ’emos’ god, it makes it sound like a type of animal, and its offensive!!!!!”

“That’s disgusting. I thought the English were smarter than that. Maybe if they looked to help the depressed instead of finding something to blame… for me, music can help me cope and release my emotions. The Daily Mail has it backwards. Sadly, here in America it’s just as bad, with the “emo” label and crap flying around. Hence people bottle it up and turn to music to cope. Maybe if people stop being so intolerant and nasty… put the blame on them if you must blame someone. But in the end it was her choice.

The Daily Mail and society as a whole must accept partial fault for this problem.”

“Another band that most of you are too young to remember is Judas Priest. These guys almost went to jail because they were accused that there were hidden messages in their music that caused two teens to kill themselves. They spent a fortune hiring lawyers to try to protect themselves against ridiculous accusations. Nothing new.”

“BEFORE YOU FOLLOW MCR OR BANDS ALIKE PLEASE THINK.

mcr is a band that, while they may be trying help “save people’s lives“, are still very troubled and instable.
it’s hard enough to try to do something so personal when you don’t know a person personally, but i think it’s even harder for mcr to offer any positive advice because they have become such cynical and bitter people growing up.

because of it, their lyrics, though empathetic and supposedly pro-living, are written, naturally, in a confusing way and centered around morbid topics.

they force you to think of suicide, because they talk about it all the time, and to dwell on your problems instead of trying to see any kind of good in the world.

FIND A LINE WITHOUT A SARCASTIC, ANGRY, OR SAD TONE, AND WITHOUT THE UNDERTONE OR IMAGERY OF BLOOD, DEATH, OR SHARP OBJECTS. they are few and far appart.

i’m not a parent or adult. i’m a teenager who listened to mcr during a bad time thinking they could help. i got so wrapped up in the “black parade” and the emo lifestyle because i wanted something to fit into and to find strength in. in the end i realized i just had to pull myself out, and now i’m very happy.

I HOPE THIS HELPED SOMEBODY.”

To Clique is to Stereotype

Posted in categorizing people, cheerleaders, cliques, cliques in school, emos, goths, jocks, nerds, punks, stereotypes, stereotypes of cheerleaders, stereotypes of cliques, stereotypes of emos, stereotypes of goths, stereotypes of jocks, stereotypes of nerds, stereotypes of punks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2008 by sweetangel16175

and i am not talking about clicking the lights on or the television…
i am talking about cliques in school
theres a lot of stereotypes about cliques in school…
sorry if i offend anyone. i am truly not trying to offend anyone. i am just trying to show all the stereotypes that are associated with these cliques… and i know they are not true… but this is what i think about when you say these cliques…

nerds are supposed to be smart, always wearing glasses, girls always are in two pig tail braids, the glasses are usually black rimmed, they usually are awkward and clumsy, they are usually in love with the most popular guy in school, they usually are not dressed up in petite clothing, the are more concerned about getting good grades, they usually make all A’s, they usually dont date or are not dating anyone

jocks are supposed to be buff, tall, hot, big guys who are into sports, like football, basketball, or hockey, the head jock usually always get the head cheerleader and they usually slept with her, they are concerned about making the next touchdown, basket, or goal, the head of the team will always get into college with a scholarship,

cheerleaders are supposed to be skinny, bitchy. little, blonde. hot girls who wave pompoms in your face at pep rallies, they usually sleep around and they usually are dating the quarterback of the football team, they usually are airheads who dont know anything, they some of the time have people do they work for them, they are usually like the plastics in mean girls, and say “like” and “whatever” and “oh my God” a lot

bad boys are supposed to wear a black leather jacket, sometimes jean jacket will do, sometimes they wear gloves, most of the time he’s hot, they always have to act “cool,” otherwise people wont think they are cool, they always have to get in trouble to impress the girls, some of the time its them who has the girl, 

goths are supposed to wear mostly black, with black nail polish and black lipstick, and make up and pale white face, they are usually called emo, and girls usually wear tiny vests and leggings, they are usually dark and write a lot of poetry about dark stuff, they usually have piercings in places besides the ear, they dont always have visible art on their body, 

punks are supposed to be rather the same as goths, except they dont wear mostly black, they too wear the vest, they too write dark poetry and usually have piercing other than in the ear, they love to listen to hard rock music,

and again this post is not here to offend anyone, i am just trying to show the stereotypes…
and every public school has them, the cheerleaders, the jocks, the nerds,
but if u strip them down to their undies, you will see that they are human, just like everyone else,
i didnt like “stick to the status quo” in high school musical, because it shows all the stereotypes of the cliques, but i do like it because people are trying to break free of these stereotypes…

i am trying to show that there are stereotypes for cliques and i really dont think its fair when you say nerd and cheerleader, you get two completely different images in your mind.

you cant categorize people based on what they wear or how they look and get the whole picture of who they are… maybe someone is a nerd, but they secretly take karate classes… and you will never know because you didn’t take the time to get to know them…

A Man on Youtube that tells it like it is!

Posted in african, anger, animosity, black and white, categorizing people, classifying people, concept of racism, conflict, crimes against humanity, freedom of speech, humanity, liberty, obama, politicallly correct dream of racism, race, racism, racism exists in the united states, racism in america, racism today, racist t-shirt of obama, society, the kkk, the klu klux klan, think about it, torture, values of humanity, war with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2008 by sweetangel16175

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEGpBIQfkMs

talking about the racist t-shirt that has obama…
I LOVE THIS GUYS INSIGHT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Eating Disorders

Posted in anorexia, anorexia nervosa, beautiful, beauty, being ugly, body image, bulimia, bulimia nervosa, categorizing people, cosumed with our looks, dont judge, eating disorders, fat, hot, if you open your eyes, images in the media, intelligence, judging other people, judging people, looks, losing weight, media, perfect, perfection, skinny, social, stereotypes, stereotypes of beauty, stereotypes of being beautiful, the beautiful belief, the belief of being beautiful, the belief of being ugly, the body is ugly, the concept of hot, the concept of ugly, think about it, ugly, women in media with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2008 by sweetangel16175

two words… that i still dont get why they even have them…
the stereotype of beauty is being skinny…
eating disorders are severe disturbances in eating behavior characterized by peroccupation with weight concerns and unhealthy effort to control weight. the vast majority of cases consist of two sometimes overlapping sydromes: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

anorexia nervosa involves intense fear of gaining weight, disturbed body image, refusal to maintain normal body weight, and dangerous measures to lose weight. two subtypes have been observed. in restricting type anorexia nervosa, people drastically reduce their food intake, sometimes literally starving themselves. in binge-eating/purging type anorexia nervosa, individuals attempt to lose weight by forcing themselves to to vomit after meals, by misusing laxatives and diuretics, and by engaging in excessive exercise

both types suffer from distrubed body image. no matter how frail they become, they insist that they are too fat. their morbid fear of obesity means that they are never satisified with their weight. if they gain a pound or two, they panic. the only thing that makes them happy is to lose more weight. the frequent result is the relentless decline in body image; people who are entering treatment for anorexia nervosa are typically 25-30% below the normal weight. because of their disturbed body image, individuals suffering from anorexia nervosa generally do not appreciate the maladaptive quality of their behavior and rarely seek treatment on their own. they are typically coaxed or coerced into treatment by friends or family member who is alarmed by their appearence.

anorexia nervosa eventually leads to a cascade of medical problems, including amenorrhea, loss of menstrual cycles, gastronintesinal problems, low blood pressure, osteroporosis, and metabolic disturbances that can lead to cardic arrest or circulatory collapse. anorexia is a serious illness that leads to death in 5-10% of patients.

bulimia nervosa involves habitually engaging in out-of control overeating followed by unhealthy compensatory efforts, such as selfinduced vomiting, fasting, abuse of laxatives and diuretics, and excessive exercise. the eating binges are usually carried out in secret and are followed by intense guilt and conern about gaining weight. these feelings motivate ill advised strategies to undo the effects of overeating. however vomiting prevents absorption of only about half of the recent consumed food, and the laxative and diuretics have negligible impact on caloric intake, so individuals suffering from bulimia nervosa typically maintain a reasonably normal weight. medical problems associated with bulimia nervosa include cardic arrythmia, dental problems, metabolic deficiencies, and gastrointestinal problems.

obviously bulimia nervosa shares many features with anorexia nervosa, such as a morbid fear of becoming obese, preoccupation with food, and a rigid maladaptive approaches to controlling weight that are grounded in naive all-or-none thinking. however the sydromes also differ in crucial ways. first and foremost, bulimia is a much less life-threatening conidition. second, although their appearance is usually more normal than seen with anorexia, people with bulimia are much more likely to recognize that their eating behavior is pathological and are more likely to cooperate with treatment

so where in the torah, the bible, or the qur’an does it say that fat people are ugly or skinny people are beautiful? thin is not the new beautiful. i hate it when people think like that. young women are comparing themselve to the girls in the media. otherwise they wont get men to love then. look at queen latifah, shes big and beautiful and a successful woman.

beauty should come from within because, as i said earlier looks fade very easily. we dont have to look a certain way to be beautiful because we are all beautiful in our own way. i think people who are anorexic and bulimic should try to focus more on their intelligence and kindness because in the end only those two things will matter more, much, much more than beauty.

“in the end, only kindness matters.”