Archive for the concept of race Category

For Obama Supporters!

Posted in african, black and white, concept of race, concept of racism, conflict, discrimination, obama with tags , , , on June 20, 2008 by sweetangel16175

For all the obama supporters !

I heard the day before yesturday that some democrats are switching to republicans because they don’t want an african american president. I think it’s very very stupid to do that, especially since obama and hillary have the same policies!

It shows that this country is still a racist country, much inclined to use epidermal racism and genism more than other form of racism.
People have to understand that race is a social concept and that we have to finally get over it. Not picking obama because of his skin color is the most primitive form of collectivism. Of course, obama has a different color skin that the white people, but that doesn’t mean he is not as a good or as educated as a white person. I am not trying to say that he’s trying to act like a white person because some white people are dumb and uneducated, same for any and all races. He’s obviously a very educated person.

The proposal:
I urge obama supporters to write a letter your congressman, urging the electoral college not to be persuaded by the popular vote. The electoral college doesn’t have to listen to the popular vote if it doesn’t want to, hence the presidential election of, I think it was rutherford b. hayes.

Why the Americans cant get over race

Posted in african, black and white, concept of race, concept of racism, conflict, identifying against, obama, politicallly correct dream of racism, race, race is a social concept, racism, racism and the concept of identifying against, racism exists in the united states, racism in america, racism today, society, unfair, violence with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 30, 2008 by sweetangel16175

(CNN) — In 1835, Alexis DeTocqueville, in his seminal work, “Democracy in America,” prophesied that the abolition of slavery would not eliminate racial prejudice, which he declared was “immovable.”

Sen. Barack Obama, in running for the presidency of the United States, is challenging DeTocqueville’s bleak assessment of the human heart. It remains unclear whether the Illinois senator is on a hopeless mission, or whether the American people will decide to make history by breaking with it.

Any discussion of race or racism inevitably stirs uncomfortable reactions. America is, indeed, a nation of immigrants. Most of our ancestors came here in search of a better life. Africans, however, arrived here in chains to make a better life for others. Yet to date, we have been unable to discuss the horrors of the enslavement, lynchings, segregation and degradation of African-Americans without prompting resentment or indifference.

“That’s all in the past,” is a common retort. “We had nothing to do with it. It’s history. Get over it.” The problem, however, as the results in a number of the primary states reveal, is that racial prejudice is not history, and neither whites nor blacks are over it.

While Obama has moved the subject of prejudice out from the shadows, more than his exotic name, origin and religious affiliation are at issue. When Colin Powell, one of America’s most accomplished military leaders and diplomats, contemplated running for the presidency in 2000, his family feared for his safety. Also, during that same year, when Sen. John McCain ran for our highest office, he was the victim of a vile, racist smear in South Carolina.

There are deep grievances held by black Americans over their past and present treatment by the white majority and equally profound resentments held by many whites over what they see as preferential treatment for the black community. Unfortunately, a discussion of the racial divide in our country is too often reduced to sound bites or shouting matches. Moreover, the preachings and exhortations of several prominent religious leaders, rather than nurturing and appealing to our spiritual needs, have instead served to inflame passions and reinforce old falsehoods and antagonisms.

We are convinced that what is needed in America is a serious, open, civil dialogue on racial, ethnic and religious prejudice. To this end, in July, we are convening a conference in Washington on race and reconciliation with political, spiritual and business leaders. Our goal: to further a national conversation about the need for truth, tolerance and reconciliation.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/05/29/cohens.race.politics/index.html?iref=hpmostpop

i dont think it would help much to jut talk about it here! we need to do something more than that!